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Western States Trail

 

This past June ACE’s Pacific West Northern branch worked on the Western States Trail for two weeks. The Western States Trail is most well-known for hosting the Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run and the Tevis Cup, a 100-Mile race on horseback. Drawing in people from across the country and world, the trail begins in Squaw Valley and runs over rugged mountains and deep canyons before finishing at Placer High School in Auburn.

The crew was led by ACE Crew Leader, Jessica Paterson in partnership with the US Forest Service and the Western States Trail Foundation. Over the course of the project, the crew primarily focused on tread maintenance and corridor clearing. Equestrians and mountain bikers utilize the trail along with runners and hikers and in some locations off-highway vehicles. This broad variety of use and challenging terrain requires extensive maintenance to keep the trail safe and passable, while also reducing erosion.  Higher vegetation clearance for horseback riders is essential and the removal of berms to help shed water will help keep the watershed healthy. The crew performed this trail work on switchbacks deep in the remote Canyons near Devils Thumb, which is challenging to access and was in need of maintenance.

The Western States Run is a test of human endurance along beautiful views of central California through canyons and across the Middle Fork of the American River. This ACE crew got to contribute to the sustainability and longevity of this trail that bears witness each year to the capacity of some of the worlds most spirited long distance runners.

http://wstrail.org/

Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge | Sonoran Pronghorn Boma Construction

The Phoenix Field School program, a major collaborative effort between ACE, BLM Phoenix District Office, Phoenix College, Arizona Center for Youth Resources (ACYR), and Arizona@Work, selects five students each semester to attend weekly integrative college classes and field projects, focusing on local conservation efforts.

In mid-October of 2018, the Field School crew worked with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge near Ajo, AZ to construct “bomas” (fenced enclosures) for threatened Sonoran pronghorn.

Due to human influence and habitat fragmentation, along with extreme drought conditions, the Sonoran pronghorn range and population has decreased dramatically in the past few decades. As a response, the USFWS began a rehabilitative captive-breeding program in 2003, using bomas to temporarily house pronghorn before transferring the animals in pairs to pre-planned areas where population growth is desired. The Cabeza Prieta NWR has also provided additional resources to support safe pronghorn population growth for decades, including multiple foraging plots and water catchments supplied by rain.

The Field School crew worked with Cabeza Prieta NWR and Arizona Game and Fish staff, along with local volunteers, to outline the fenced bomas with several layers of hanging blankets, aiming to protect the pronghorn from injury, as well as to allow for shade inside the enclosure. Each layer was intricately secured with sturdy hog rings and fencing pliers, ensuring a safe space for the animals to graze in the weeks leading up to capture.

At the end of the project, the crew was able to use a telescopic lens to view an existing boma filled with Sonoran pronghorn. A member of Arizona Game and Fish discussed how pronghorn and other wildlife can be collared and tracked using telemetry, or the automatic communication transmission of data, which assists in measuring population dynamics and redistribution efforts.

 

For more information on Phoenix Field School, in partnership with ACE, BLM, ACYR, and Phoenix College click here: ACE Youth and Community Programming

Bryce Canyon National Park | Fencing

A lesser-known form of conservation is the building and repair of cattle fences on public lands. Cattle grazing takes place adjacent to many protected areas such as Bryce Canyon National Park. This summer, crews from ACE’s Mountain West branch worked to fix old fence line and build new fence in Utah’s iconic National Park. 

Cattle that have wandered past their grazing grounds are known as “trespass cattle”, these cattle have created a potential issue at a well site in Bryce Canyon. Old and broken fences likely allowed these cattle to wander this close to the well site. A wildfire a few years ago has also contributed to fence damage. The burned trees have begun falling on the fence line, taking down parts of the fence.

This project was completed in partnership with the National Park Service at Bryce Canyon National Park. ACE is proud to return to work at this beautiful National Park and to be a part of protecting its natural resources.

The ACE crew was responsible for repairing the fence and building a new fence to be cattle proof with the goal of protecting the water of  Bryce Canyon National Park and Bryce Canyon City. The work was completed using fencing pliers, fence stretcher, post hole diggers, digging bars, picks, shovels, saws, and pounders. 

Bryce Canyon National Park | Prairie Dog Habitat Restoration

Throughout summer 2018, ACE Mountain-West had crews on a habitat restoration project with Bryce Canyon National Park. With the goal of protecting the threatened Utah Prairie Dog, the crews worked to remove rubber rabbitbrush around existing prairie dog habitat.

Facing habitat loss, plague, predation and livestock grazing in their habitat, the Utah Prairie Dog population has taken a hit. In the 1920s an attempt to control their populations by poisoning the colonies and agricultural and grazing activities devastated the population. By the early 1970s, the Utah Prairie Dog had been eliminated from major portions of its historical range and had declined to an estimated 3,300 individuals distributed among 37 Utah Prairie Dog colonies.

Today the populations have increased and stabilized, but there is still work being done to maintain these numbers, especially in Bryce Canyon National Park where recent exposure to the plague have impacted population numbers. Prairie dogs burrow underground to build their homes as protection from predators. They do this in groups, burrowing extensive channels called “towns” to live in with their clan. Rabbitbrush grows too high for the prairie dogs to be able to spot their prey so in turn, when the brush grows to high the prairie dogs will abandon their “towns.”

To combat this, our ACE crew, led ACE Crew Leader by Katey Hockenbury worked to remove invasive brush around their habitat within the Park. The crew tracked their progress with pin flags and GPS coordinates in the sea of rabbitbrush they were removing.

https://www.nps.gov/brca/index.htm

BioBlast! – And EPIC Youth Event

Our 2018 BLM DHA Wildlife Technician Intern, Esther Daraciang, who is serving with the BLM Salt Lake Field Office, developed and hosted BioBlast!, an environmental education event that hosted 100 local students from a partnering elementary school in Salt Lake City.

Students traveled up to Big Cottonwood Canyon at Silver Lake and spent the day participating in wildlife viewing (searching for Pikas), identifying local fish, and learned about water cycles and macro-invertebrates!

Esther is an intern with ACE EPIC and the BLM, and invited ACE EPIC staff to come volunteer for the day with these youth. ACE staff had the opportunity to volunteer with current interns, alumni, BLM staff, and local volunteers, as well as supporting all the students who attended the event!

Thank you to our EPIC staff  and Alumni for participating in this event: Kelly Barrett, Erin Mounce, Katelyn Jordan, Suzy Lee, and Melissa Early. ACE Interns – Esther Daraciang, Nichole ‘Nik’ MacPhee .  ACE Alumni (now BLM Employees) – Tess Webb, Clayton Anderson, Adam Erdmann, Hannah Cowen, Mitchell Kleimeyer.

A special thank you to Esther Daraciang who put together this video highlighting this amazing environmental education event.

 

Mount Sanitas Trail

A “typical” term with ACE South West varies from corps member to corps member but on average when members come in; they spend three to six months getting sent to a variety of projects and locations. For the last six months, however,  ACE had one crew working on a project in Boulder, Colorado from start to finish.

                                                                                  

The project took place on the Mount Sanitas Trail in partnership with the City of Boulder’s Open Space and Mountain Parks. The crew was led by ACE Crew Leader, Kaitlin Egan and ACE Project Manager, David Vayhinger. Located within the city of Boulder, the trail is just a half mile west of 4th Street on Mapleton Avenue. Mount Sanitas Trail is a moderate to difficult, heavily trafficked trail which offers beautiful views as well as access to several bouldering areas.

From March until August of 2019 the crew worked on general trail maintenance but more significantly, they built an expansive rock staircase which totaled in 39 rock steps being installed. The crew also put in a 228 square foot retaining wall. Grip hoists, rock bars, and drills allowed the crew to move, shape and position the rocks into these formations. This rockwork project has been a considerable undertaking for the ACE crew and staff who worked and lived side by side for the duration of the project.

   

ACE is thankful to have worked with the City of Boulder on this project and hope to continue to have our corps members learn and grow alongside the Open Space and Mountain Parks staff.

El Yunque National Forest – Puerto Rico

On June 25th, 2018 our ACE Southeast branch had 5 amazing high school graduates begin 300 hour AmeriCorps terms. These eager young people had never heard of AmeriCorps until they had learned of the  opportunity to serve with ACE in their native, Puerto Rico.

This crew worked in the El Yunque  National Forest which is located on the eastern side of the island. El Yunque is a lush tropical rainforest and national reserve known for rare trees and birds with many camping and hiking trails. This particular area was hit very hard by Hurricane Maria, and the vast majority of it is still not open. There is debris on the trails, as well as affected roads that make traversing the forest unsafe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This team, led by crew leader Alberto Rivera Rodriguez,  is working hard alongside United States Forest Service staff to help restore and open one of the landmarks, Yokahu Tower, on July 4. They also worked on trail maintenance along the Angelito Trail, a popular hike to a watering hole.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This crew, known as the El Yunque crew, were so inspired by their ACE – AmeriCorps experience they wrote autobiographies detailing their background and experience. (See biographies below)

Congratulations on terms well served and a job well done to our El Yunque crew. We wish them all the best as they all plan to head off to college this fall.

We are so proud of this group and their ACE – AmeriCorps pride can be seen in their photographs as they  hold the patches that they were going to stitch on to their ACE shirts. Biographies: 

Jan Carrasquillo Montañez

Hi, my name is Jan Carrasquillo Montañez. I am 18 years old, live in Fajardo [Puerto Rico]. My main hobbies are going to the beach, watching movies, and so many others. Today, I am a part of AmeriCorps, which is an organization to conserve nature. Presently, me and my partners are working to restore El Yunque, which is a forest located in Puerto Rico. The main reason for me being here is because I am committed to help El Yunque and all of Puerto Rico after the travesty of Hurricane Maria. I hope that many others can get inspired and join AmeriCorps to restore our beautiful landmarks. I want to be a member of AmeriCorps because I want to learn to conserve the environment, which is so vital to our lives. The thing that excites me the most about this experience is to do things that I’ve never done before. Also, to grow as a person and an individual.

Andrea Romȧn Vȧzuez

I am 18 years old. I like to dance, watch TV series, take care of my pets, go to church and listen to some music. I decided to join ACE because I love nature and having the opportunity to conserve it and restoring it motivated me. Learning about this can open the doors for helping, and I can show other people how to do it. Having a job experience caught my attention, and in the long run will be a lot of help. I want to be a member of AmeriCorps to obtain knowledge about the environment, and how to take care of it. After this experience, I want to continue my studies. I want to use the Education Award for my Bachelor’s in Arts, with a concentration in drama.

 

 

Bryan Carasquillo Llamas

Hi, my name is Bryan Carrasquillo Llamas. I’m 19. I like photography, writing, graphic designs, cooking, and mixing music. The reason for me to join ACE is cause I love to work in this environment. I’ve worked in a lot of projects for school that have to do with environmental issues. My dream job is working in the forest service or something similar, and ACE gave me my first opportunity to work in the place I love.

 

 

 

 

Estefany Gonzȧlez Ramos

Hello! My name is Estefany Gonzȧlez Ramos. I am 18 years old. I really like baseketball and the beach. I’m in the ACE company, because they offer many opportunities, since they help me grow in the environment and the forest [sectors]. Besides that, I am in this company since in the passage of Hurricane Maria, there were many destructions. I would like to restore the forest.

 

 

 

Wesley Santos Matta

Hi, my name is Wesley Santos Matta. I’m 19 and I love to ride my bicycle. I love to raise chickens and share time with my grandma. The reason for me to join ACE, it was because I love nature and I think this is an opportunity for me to learn and share a close time with the forest. I live with my grandmother in El Yunque National Forest in a neighborhood behind the main entrance.  After Hurricane Maria, I was bored and sad. I went to an old man in my neighborhood, and he gave me a little chicken. I loved her. I took care of her, and then other people gave me chickens. Now, I have 20 and I love them all. Almost every single one of them were presents to me. I now have a duck, also. She was blind when I first found her, and I took care of her hurt eye with triple antibiotics. She’s healed now, but still blind. I want to get a snake, but      my grandmother says no. One day, I want to have a farm in El Yunque.

 

 

Inyo National Forest | Lamarck Lakes Trail

At the start of this summer, eight Tahoe based corps members packed up their tents and tools and hiked into the backcountry of the Inyo National Forest, California. The Inyo encompasses sections of the eastern Sierra Nevada and the White Mountains of California and Nevada as well as Mount Whitney, the highest point in the continental US.

 This ongoing project will continue for four months this year on the Lamarck Lakes Trail. The trail ends at the 13,000′ Lamarck Col and is the most popular access for climbers accessing the Evolution Range, which is a world famous climbing destination for alpinists.  As a result of its growing popularity and harsh winters, the trail requires extensive rockwork and maintenance which began in 2017 and is continuing this season through October 2018.

Working in the backcountry and in the John Muir Wilderness requires a particular sensitivity. The work being done will be accomplished with primitive tools and traditional skills. The crew will be rock bars, double jacks, and other basic trail work tools to achieve the project goals. Pack mules have been integral in being able to complete this project by packing up tools, food and other supplies for the crew throughout the summer. 

Overall the goal is to improve trail safety for hikers and equestrians, including water bar repairs and maintenance, tread stabilization, step and check dam repairs, stream channel debris removal, and retaining wall stabilization. Short reroutes and restoration of the abandoned trails will also be completed. The crew experienced some setbacks this summer from two weeks of severe thunderstorms which caused a landslide that washed out the trailhead. 

ACE Pacific West is laying a strong foundation for this ongoing project. This partnership with the US Forest Service has instilled skills and values within the ACE crew members and ACE is excited to see the progression of this project.

 

Introducing the Southern California Conservation Corps Collaborative

Introducing the Southern California Conservation Corps Collaborative. ACE proudly partnered with LA Conservation Corps and Conservation Corps of Long Beach on a meaningful project in the Angeles National Forest. This Collaboration effort was funded by the @U.S. Forest Service and @National Fish and Wildlife Foundation with the goals of removing invasive species, seed collection, propagation, micro trash removal, restoration of riparian corridors, trail system improvements and helping to restore the fire damaged areas of the ANF.


Working together we can accomplish great things! Thank you to all of the dedicated corpsmembers for your hard work and telling your story.

ACE welcomes new President and CEO, Laura Herrin

For Immediate Release:

Flagstaff, AZ, July 11, 2018–

American Conservation Experience (ACE) proudly announces the selection of Laura Herrin as its new President and Chief Executive Officer. Laura begins her leadership role at ACE on July 16, 2018, succeeding ACE Founder, Chris Baker who is stepping down after 15 years of exceptional service and organizational growth nationwide.


“Laura Herrin has dedicated her career to youth and young adult development and conservation corps programs and has a great track record of accomplishments,” said Brad Bippus, ACE’s board chair. “Laura has a very obvious passion for ACE’s dual mission of on-the-ground environmental work and providing meaningful opportunities for young people. We are delighted to have Laura, with her very impressive skills and many years of leadership experience, take the helm of ACE.”

Since 2002, Laura Herrin has been an integral part of the growth and success of one of the most recognized nonprofit industry leaders in youth conservation and outdoor programs, The Student Conservation Associations (SCA). Laura’s vision and leadership led to a series of promotions over her 15 years with SCA, encompassing a tenure that included roles as National Director, Innovation Director and culminating in to the position of Senior Vice President. Laura took a leading role to create strategies around revenues, program development, and risk and safety management. In addition, she has been vital in negotiating cooperative agreements, developing new programs and partnerships, and managed a significant revenue budget for SCA. Laura currently advocates for the entire conservation corps industry through her position as Partnership Director with the Corps Network.

“I am thrilled to be joining a talented and passionate team at ACE,” says Laura. It is my goal to continue the work of and to build on the foundation that has made this organization a leader in the conservation field. We will continue to focus on being the partner of choice, completing important and needed conservation work, being the program of choice for young people wanting to do this work, and the employer of choice, attracting and engaging a diverse and talented staff.”

ACE Founder, Chris Bakers says. “Laura’s career has been defined by innovation, perseverance, and commitment to conservation corps. Her resume is robust, but much more importantly, I’ve always found her to be open, honest, direct, and engaging. The confidence and vision Laura embodies will ultimately inspire change and ACE will continue to thrive.”

Laura Herrin is a passionate, dedicated Executive Leader with an exceptional record of launching and building effective programs and consistent revenue growth. ACE is pleased to have her join our growing organization.

ACE is grounded in the philosophy that cooperative labor on meaningful conservation projects fosters cross cultural understanding and operates in the belief that challenging volunteer service unites people of all backgrounds in common cause.
If you would like more information please contact Susie Jardine at 928-226-6960 or email at susie@usaconservation.org.

Coronado National Forest – Bark Beetle Treatment

A 10 person ACE Southwest crew completed a project in the Coronado National Forest with the goal of protecting the fire-weakened forest from potential bark beetle invasion. Over the course of three months, the crew learned some serious orienteering skills and tree identification.

Crews deployed pheromone caps across 550+ acres. The areas that were treated were identified by the Forest Service as Mt Graham Red Squirrel habitats. ACE crews helped the Forest Service confirm locations of this endangered animal. At last count, there were only 35 remaining in the wild!

Two different types of pheromone caps were used. MCH and Verbenone. They are anti-aggregate pheromones that essentially tell a bark beetle that is searching for a place to lay their eggs that the tree is full and to keep on flying. The bark beetle then flies to the next tree and is told the same thing “sorry the inn is full! No vacancies!” Eventually the bark beetle gets too tired to continue to fly and dies.

The MCH packets protect Douglas firs and Verbenone protects southwestern white pines from bark beetle attack. This was a unique restoration project for our ACE’rs and we are so proud of the contribution made by our team.

 

 

 

ACE Announces The Departure Of President, Christopher Baker

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 9, 2018

Contact – Susie Jardine
Telephone – 928-226-6960
Address: 2900 N. Fort Valley Rd.
Flagstaff, AZ 86001
Email – susie@usaconservation.org
Website – www.usaconservation.org

Flagstaff, AZ, March 9, 2018 –

It is with deep appreciation and gratitude for his leadership and service that the Board of Directors announces Chris Baker’s departure as President and CEO of American Conservation Experience (ACE), effective June 30, 2018.

Chris founded ACE in August 2003 and under his guidance it has developed into a nationally recognized leader in the conservation community engaging thousands of young adults in the accomplishment of practical environmental restoration projects in America’s national parks, forests, wildlife refuges and other public lands.

Although Chris will be greatly missed by the board, staff, corps members, and partners alike we wish him great success in his new endeavor as the co-founder of Conservation United Insurance (CUI), where he will continue to support and consult conservation corps and other nonprofit organizations across the nation.

We want to thank him for the 15 years of dedicated service as well as his inspirational leadership and mentorship which involved many significant accomplishments and contributions, including but not limited to:

  • Expanding ACE’s service footprint from a small office in Flagstaff, AZ to direct service in 42 states and 3 territories.
  • Growing the original staff of 3 to 75 full-time leaders in the conservation community.
  • Providing conservation opportunities for over 8,000 young adults (and counting), including 1,300 conservation corps members and interns in 2017 alone.
  • Contribution of over 3.5 million hours or 10,700 crew weeks of service on America’s public lands since 2004.
  • Placement of 1,859 members in the Corps Network AmeriCorps program in 2016-2017 with 1216 members serving in crew based placements, 641 serving in individual or internship placements.
  • Development of enduring, nationally-scaled partnerships with multiple federal land management agencies, including the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Forest Service as well as AmeriCorps national service program programs under the state and national programs of the Corporation for National Community Service and others.
  • Development of dozens of federal, state, municipal, and nonprofit partnerships.

In the coming weeks, ACE’s Board of Directors will conduct a nationwide search to identify our new President and CEO.
http://www.usaconservation.org/ceo-position-announcement/

During this period of transition, we are fortunate for the continuity afforded by a great many talented and committed staff and board members.
Our team will work hard to ensure the seamless continuation of the professional field standards, support for its corps members and interns, and both the quality of work and the high degree of accountability that our stakeholders have come to associate with ACE.

We cannot adequately thank Chris enough for his vision, passion, enthusiasm, motivation and dedication. ACE emerges from Chris’s founding 15-year tenure stronger than ever, well prepared and excited for the next chapters, as we continue to harness the energy and idealism of the next generation of stewards of America’s public lands.

Brad Bippus, Chair
Board of Directors
American Conservation Experience
______________________________________________________________

From Chris Baker, President and Chief Executive Officer,
American Conservation Experience

After a decade and half with the American Conservation Experience (ACE),
I have submitted my resignation to the board in order to pursue new opportunities. The decision for my transition did not come easily as I am extremely proud of all that the American Conservation Experience has achieved and the colleagues and corps members who I have had the honor of working alongside over the last 15 years.

While I have a mix of emotions as I move into this next chapter of my career, as the Co-founder of Conservation United Insurance (CUI), I will be able to continue in the work that has become so important to me: helping to support the capacity of the corps industry as well as nonprofits in general from a new operational perspective.

I want to give my deepest gratitude to all who have been so supportive of the organization and of me personally and professionally over the years: staff, current and past ACE members/interns, board members, and, of course, our partners. Without all of you, the organization would not be as strong and vibrant as it is. I am so honored to have been the leader of this incredible organization and will watch with much excitement and anticipation as it makes strides in supporting and creating continued solutions for environmental restorations across the nation and US territories.

Sincerely,

Chris Baker

______________________________________________________________

ACE is grounded in the philosophy that cooperative labor on meaningful conservation projects fosters cross cultural understanding and operates in the belief that challenging volunteer service unites people of all backgrounds in common cause.

If you would like more information contact Susie Jardine at susie@usaconservation.org or 928-226-6960

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EPIC visits National Wildlife Refuges – A Journey of Exploration

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ACE-EPIC Director Shane Barrow and ACE’s newly hired U.S.Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Program Director, Kevin Sloan paid a recent visit to Desert National Wildlife Refuge Complex headquarters in Las Vegas, Nevada to meet with Project Leader Christy Smith.  Kevin enjoyed a 30-year career with the FWS and recently retired before taking his new position with ACE-EPIC in Salt Lake City.

Kevin and Shane traveled 100 miles north of Las Vegas to visit the Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), one of the refuges in the Desert National Wildlife Refuge Complex.  This particular refuge has special significance for Kevin because, in the late 1990’s, he served as Pahranagat’s Refuge Manager.

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Kevin and Shane met with Pahranagat NWR Manager Rob Vinson to learn of the many habitats and infrastructure improvements that have been made at Pahranagat. These improvements include hydrologic restoration in Black Canyon and a new visitor center, which highlights the importance of the Pahranagat Valley to the Native American Tribes in the area as well as the importance of refuge habitats to migratory and resident birds including southwestern willow flycatcher and Sandhill crane.  Pahranagat NWR, the “place of many waters,” has supported human habitation for thousands of years and is one of a string of desert wetland “pearls,” providing critical habitat in this transition area of the Mojave and Great Basin deserts.

This was a significant journey of exploration for ACE-EPIC.  Kevin’s career experience in the FWS and his vast network of FWS contacts allow a very high level of immersion into FWS culture with a highlight on field-level conservation needs. This level of knowledge will enable ACE-EPIC to adapt to meet the future needs of the FWS as well as the needs of aspiring young talent seeking careers in conservation.

Our congratulations to both Christy and Rob on a job well done!  We look forward to providing many highly-qualified interns through our ongoing partnership with FWS to protect and enhance wildlife and their habitats for the benefit of all Americans but mainly for the benefit of younger generations of conservation stewards.

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Bryce Canyon | Forest Thinning

ACE has taken part in multiple forest thinning projects across the Southwest over the last several years. Each project has had a similar objective in mind: wildfire prevention. Each year wildfires have increased in severity and occurrences, and it has become more crucial than ever to remove the lower level fuels that allow them to become more severe.

Fall of 2017 proved to be a very busy time for our ACE Utah crews in regards to fuels reduction. Crews performed forest thinning in beautiful, Bryce Canyon National Park, for an eight-day project. 

A blue ribbon is tied to the fence on the corner of West Clay Avenue, Flagstaff March 22nd, 2017.

Forest thinning helps to prevent wildfires from becoming catastrophic. ACE’s part in this aspect of wildfire prevention is to remove any trees that would serve as ladder fuel. Ladder fuel is a firefighting term for live or dead vegetation that allows a fire to climb up from the landscape or forest floor into the tree canopy. This means cutting down any tree species that are easier to catch fire, trees of a specific diameter, and removing any dead or down trees.

The crew comes off of a lunch break at one of the canyon's overlooks.

The crew comes off of a lunch break at one of the canyon’s overlooks.

In Bryce Canyon National Park the ACE crew was led by crew leader, Brandon Lester. The primary objective of this project was to protect limber pines and bristlecone pines as well as Douglas firs and Ponderosa pines. Douglas firs and Ponderosa pines are being protected because they tend to be more resilient against wildfires. By keeping these more resilient species and thinning more flammable species, the forest becomes less prone to catastrophic wildfires. The bristlecone pines are being protected because in this area they tend to be very old and the limber pines are being protected because they are a more rare species. By selecting certain species ACE is working to create a healthier pine forest.

 

Crew members swamp branches and trees that have been cut into piles for prescribed burns that will be conducted by the parks service.

Crew members swamp branches and trees that have been cut into piles for prescribed burns that will be conducted by the parks service.

To do this the crew was reducing the number of flammable species such as white firs and some of the Douglas firs that could potentially become ladder fuels. The crew was also targeting trees that were growing in clumps and trees that were growing too close to the species they were trying to protect. For example, the crew was not directly targeting Douglas firs but if there were any Douglas firs growing too close to a Ponderosa pine, then the crew would remove that tree.

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During this single eight-day project the crew aimed to thin approximately three acres within the park. ACE is incredibly fortunate to have the opportunity to return to work in this beautiful national park and look forward to our continued partnership with the National Park Service and our friends at Bryce Canyon National Park.

For more information on Bryce Canyon National Park click here: Bryce Canyon National Park

 

 

 

 

Dry Lake Hills Forest Thinning [video]

The past summer ACE Arizona partnered with the City of Flagstaff, the US Forest Service, the Flagstaff Watershed Protection Project and the National Forest Foundation to complete an 18-week forest thinning project in the Coconino National Forest, in the Dry Lakes Hill Region. This area has not had previous fuels management, leaving it at high risk for future catastrophic wildfires and post-fire flood impacts. ACE is proud to share this video as a representation of the great work being done within our local community to help keep the city of Flagstaff a safe and healthy place to live and the wonderful collaborative efforts of our partners.

Thank you to our amazing partners who contributed to the making of this video

Grand Canyon National Park – Trail Maintenance

One of ACE’s longest running partnerships is with the Grand Canyon National Park. This past summer and in to the fall ACE crews worked on several of the many trails in and around the canyon.

A blue ribbon is tied to the fence on the corner of West Clay Avenue, Flagstaff March 22nd, 2017.

ACE had two crews working on two different trails in the canyon, the Bright Angel and the Hermit trail. The crew on Bright Angel was led by ACE crew leader, Hannah Baskin and the Hermit trail crew was led by ACE crew leader, Stephanie Gonzales. Both of these trails experience heavy foot traffic in the summer months. In addition to hikers, the Bright Angel trail also supports mules tours as well as pack mules throughout the year.

A blue ribbon is tied to the fence on the corner of West Clay Avenue, Flagstaff March 22nd, 2017.

Both crews were performing cyclical maintenance on the trails. This usually encompasses widening tread, clearing drains, reinforcing water bars, brushing and clearing the trail of any obstacles. The canyon trails require attention all year long because of the constant erosion that happens within the canyon walls.

A blue ribbon is tied to the fence on the corner of West Clay Avenue, Flagstaff March 22nd, 2017.

On the Bright Angel trail the crew was performing general maintenance as well as assisting the National Parks Service trail crew with a rock work project. Some of the crew members were on patrol to make sure that hikers were safe while the work was being completed and other crew members got to try their hand at the rock drill.

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On the Hermit trail the crew was using a grip hoist to move some large boulders from the trail. Using rock bars the crew was able to move boulders out of the main trail and repair parts of the trail that were eroded by flooding.

A blue ribbon is tied to the fence on the corner of West Clay Avenue, Flagstaff March 22nd, 2017.

Going into the fall ACE crews will continue working further down the Bright Angel Trail and eventually to Phantom Ranch at the bottom of the canyon. Our staff and corps members continue to feel grateful that they are able to serve in and contribute to the protection of this park.

A blue ribbon is tied to the fence on the corner of West Clay Avenue, Flagstaff March 22nd, 2017.

Arizona Trail | Pine, AZ

ACE Arizona has been working with the Arizona Trail Association on several different sections of the 800-mile trail. In September ACE had a crew led by Katherine Dickey and Natalie Kolesar working just outside of Pine, AZ. Over the course of two eight-day projects, the crew worked on general trail maintenance as well as building rock structures and building footbridges with timber construction.

Crew members debark the logs to prevent the logs from rotting.

Crew members debark the logs to prevent the logs from rotting.

The crew put in two puncheon foot bridges within approximately the first mile of the trail. The process of putting in these creek crossings involves debarking, “ripping” the log, hauling the split logs up to the puncheon sites and setting them in place. Ripping refers to the act of splitting the tree lengthwise; each half provides the walking surface of the bridge. The bark is first removed from the tree trunk because the bark holds in moisture, to keep these wood structures from rotting the bark is scraped off by hand. To set the logs, the crew members dig holes for smaller logs to sit in on either side of the creek. Those logs are then reinforced with crush (small rock fragments) to hold the logs in place. Then, the larger logs receive saddle notches so that they fit like puzzle pieces on top of their smaller counterparts.

National Trails Trainer, Mark Loseth teaches crew leader, Katherine Dickey to make measurements on the log for saddle notches.

National Trails Trainer, Mark Loseth teaches crew leader, Katherine Dickey to make measurements on the log for saddle notches.

The purpose of putting in bridges over creek crossings is to prevent erosion and sedimentation in the creek. This area of Arizona is a very delicate riparian zone. It is one of the few places in Arizona where you can see a multitude of tree species including maple and alder trees. This type of lumber work requires a lot of measuring, leveling, and precision with the chainsaw. ACE National Trails Trainer, Mark Loseth visited the crew and made sure that crew was entirely equipt with the tools and knowledge to get the work done.

Crew members roll the log into position to be cut.

Crew members roll the log into position to be cut.

During the second half of this project, the crew built armored drain pans along some of the eroded parts of the trail. The armored drain pans protect the path and direct water off of the trail. A multi-tiered rock wall and rock steps were also put in by the crew during the duration of this project.

Crew Leader, Katherine Dickey rips the log in half to create the platform for the footbridge.

Crew Leader, Katherine Dickey rips the log in half to create the platform for the footbridge.

ACE has been fortunate to have completed multiple sections of trail work along the 800-mile Arizona Trail and would like to thank our partners at the Arizona Trails Association. For more information on this trail follow the link below:

https://aztrail.org/the-trail/

Crew members haul the logs by hand to the puncheon sites.

Crew members haul the logs by hand to the puncheon sites.

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