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Pinnacles National Park – Jawbone Canyon – EPIC Intern Team works on Vegetation and Restoration

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In Pinnacles National Park ACE currently has two EPIC interns working the with the park’s Vegetation and Restoration team. The park’s restoration team is lead by Park Ranger Mike Shelley with the  main objective to restore and protect native plant species and to maintain the landscape.

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Joshua Mosebach and Karina Garcia (ACE EPIC Interns) of the restoration team take part in native seed collecting, planting, monitoring and research. The internship is currently six weeks into a twenty-one week program in the park. “I’ve learned a lot about working in the federal government and the park service during the last few weeks,” explained Karina, “I didn’t know that the park conducts research and works with native american tribes.”  While Karina is still determining what path she would like to pursue, she explained that she has been able to explore a variety of different career paths within the National Parks Service during her time in the park.

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During the week of April 24th, 2017 the team was working in Jawbone Canyon on the west side of Pinnacles National Park. A new trail has been slated to go through the canyon and through a section of Italian thistle, an invasive species. It is crucial for the invasive plants to be removed from the trails, as  “the seeds will attach to hikers boots and pant legs and spread to other areas of the park,” Mike Shelley explained during his introduction to invasive species removal with a local Native American tribe.

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The park has been working with the Amah Mutsun Land Trust since 2009 on various local projects. The Amah Mutsun Land Trust group came out with the team to work on the removal of this area of Italian Thistle. There are two areas in the park that have cultural significance to the tribe because the areas contain deer grass and white root sage. These are plants that are used for weaving by the tribe. The park and tribe worked together to have the first prescribed burn of deer sage since the mission period.dsc_1246

California State Parks Director visits the Garrapata State Park Project

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On Wednesday,  April 19th, 2017 California State Parks Director, Lisa Mangat and ACE CEO and founder, Chris Baker met at the site of an ongoing project in Garrapata State Park.

This project marks the beginning of a partnership between California State Parks and ACE, a partnership which both parties hope to maintain for the years to come.

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The visit allowed for ACE California Assistant Director, Eric Robertson, and Chris Baker to review the progress that has been made over the last several months, as well as outline the work that will continue into the summer of 2017.

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Lisa Mangat met members of the trails crew and learned a little bit about each of their backgrounds. The ACE trail crew has been working closely with the California State Parks trail crew building wooden steps, as well as a multi-tier retaining wall which will serve as a lookout. 

dsc_9146Pictured: Corpsmembers, Ohica-Hadiya Ali, Zachary Weidner, Taylor Quigley and Sarah Phillips. California State Parks staff, Lorraine Turner, Jim Doran, John Hiles, Lisa Mangat and Karl Knapp. ACE staff, Eric Roberterson and Christopher Baker.

Happy National Bike Month!

ACE Arizona – Rockhound State Park – New Mexico – Trail Work

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During the week of March 27th, ACE Arizona crew members served at Rockhound State park in New Mexico. The crews were lead by Katherine Dickey. Rockhound is located in the Little Florida Mountains and known for its abundance of minerals that visitors are allowed to collect. This is the second project ACE has participated in at the state park.

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The ACE crews worked on two separate trails in the park. One crew reconstructed part of the Spring Canyon trail which has been closed since 2002. The reconstruction included creating a reroute on the trail because the original route was too steep for hikers. This involved building check steps, a rock staircase, tread widening and brushing. There were also many social trails that the crew worked to block off to concentrate foot traffic to the main trail.

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The second crew worked on the Lovers Leap trail with three main objectives. The crew built a retaining wall, a staircase, and widened the tread of the trail. After the main objectives were completed, the crew provided general maintenance which included brushing and back sloping the tread.

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The previous ACE crew that went out to the park and worked on the Lovers Leap trail trail created switchbacks. The ACE’s New Mexico state park partners were excited to have the crew back to put finishing touches on the trail; the crew was grateful to have the opportunity to spend time in such a beautiful park.

Oak Creek Canyon – Sedona, AZ – A.B. Young Trail – Trail Maintenance

A blue ribbon is tied to the fence on the corner of West Clay Avenue, Flagstaff March 22nd, 2017.

A blue ribbon is tied to the fence on the corner of West Clay Avenue, Flagstaff March 22nd, 2017.

Late March our ACE Arizona crews continued trail maintenance in Sedona, AZ in Oak Creek Canyon. The crew was working with the Red Rocks Ranger District branch of the US Forest Service. The crew that was lead by senior crew leader John Donovan was working on the A.B Young Trail. The trail was reconstructed in the 1930’s by the Civilian Conservation Corps under the supervision of A.B. Young. “The trail was once a cattle trail that was used to transport produce up to the main wagon roads”, explained John Donovan.

ACE crew member is using a McCloed to widen an existing trail.

The goal of this project was general trail maintenance. The crew was primarily brushing the trail. They also spent time building a small retaining wall and they cleared debris to provide proper trail drainage. 

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ACE has been working with the Red Rocks Ranger District since the beginning of the year and our corps members are very fortunate to be apart of the conservation efforts of the area. This is the first of two projects that will be working on the AB Young trail.

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ACE in Huffington Post – Engaging Women in Conservation by The Corps Network

Last month was Women in History month. In recognition of this month-long celebration, our amazing partners at The Corps Network did an informative piece for Huffington Post Blog. They reached out to women within the conservation world who literally blaze trails: the women of Conservation Corps.

We are thrilled that some of the women on our ACE staff as well as some of our female crew leaders and crews were quoted and shown throughout this article.

Thank you to our staff that contributed to this wonderful article: Director of California, Sarah Miggins, National Restoration Program Manager Afton McKusick, Crew Leaders, Jenny Diamond and Krish Karau, photo of corps member, Kyia Foster, Photojournalist, Jessica Plance, Director of Communications, Susie Jardine, President/CEO, Christopher Baker.

Click here for article: Engaging Woman in Conservation

 

 

 

Arizona Trail – Four Peaks – Trail Restoration

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This past February, ACE Arizona had a crew working in the Four Peaks region located 40 miles northeast of Phoenix, on a section of the Arizona Trail. This is a part of an ongoing project to improve the condition of the Arizona Trail which in turn improves accessibility to the Mazatzal Wilderness. The Mazatzal Wilderness protects 252,500 acres of the Tonto and Coconino National Forests.

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 This project was lead by crew leader David Vayhinger. The work began just north of Mill Ridge trail head. The goal of the project was to create a stock bypass to get three projects worth of water up the trail for  future back-country projects. A section of trail was washed out by rain making the trail impassable to mules and stock animals and very difficult to pass for hikers. The crew had to reroute this area to create a passable section of trail.

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For the crew this meant creating rock steps which fit the requirements for pack animals. “It’s slightly more complicated to build steps for stock animals than for people”, explained crew leader David Vayhinger, “we need to consider everything from how high they are able to step to the width of tread that the mules need to make a turn”.

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Mules will be taking water up the trail for three back-country projects which will continue to work on passage twenty of the Arizona Trail. In addition to the rock steps the crew was doing general maintenance on the trail including brushing and tread widening.

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Currently ACE has two other ongoing projects along different areas of the Arizona Trail which all aim to improve the accessibility of the trail which extends from Mexico to Utah.

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Our ongoing work on the Arizona Trail has been very rewarding to not only our corps members but to our staff who have been dedicated to it’s restoration and preservation over the last several years. There will be approximately ten more projects working on this area of the Arizona Trail.

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